The Best Books On Teen Grief and Loss – Part One

Teens, let’s face it, grief is a difficult emotional process to go through. It’s can be a long road that requires patience and self-care. Although parents and caregivers and everyone around you will want to do what they can to help you move through it faster, the truth is, the process needs time.

It needs tending to but you don’t need to rush it. At same time, you don’t want to completely ignore your pain. You don’t want to never look at it or push it away with drugs or drinking. It’s best to be with it, let your feelings be there.

And you can facilitate your healing process by talking to others about how you feel.  You might also simply need time alone, time to digest what’s going on inside and around you. The following list of books is meant to be a resource for you to draw upon. Teens, when you’re looking for support but you don’t necessarily want to go to someone, you can turn to the gentle words in these books:

Straight Talk About Death for Teenagers: How to Cope with Losing Someone You Love by Earl A. Grollman

The author of this book knows grief and knows teenagers well. It is a unique book that is a combination of both prose and poetry, speaking directly to the hearts and minds of readers.

Fire in My Heart, Ice in My Veins: A Journal for Teenagers Experiencing a Loss by Enid Samuel Traisman

This journal invites teenagers to work through their grief in a creative and healthy way.

 

When A Friend Dies: A Book for Teens About Grieving and Healing by Marilyn E. Gootman, Pamela Espeland, and Deborah Prothrow-Stith

This is a quick read for teens who are grieving, but its short chapters are filled with support.

 

The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald

The author of this book takes a look at how the unique needs of teenagers are affected by grief and loss. She explores how being a teen while also experiencing grief can present unique challenges that need special attention.

 

Child’s View of Grief by Alan D. Wolfelt, Lori Mackey (Illustrator)

This is a resource for parents, providing them with principles and tools to help their children cope with grief.

 

Healing Your Grieving Heart: 100 Practical Ideas for Teens by Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D.

Each page of this book provides a different idea to help teens recognize mourning as a natural process. It’s perfect for students in grades seven and above.

 

After Suicide by John H. Hewett and Wayne E. Oates

This book is for the individual in the throes of responding to the suicide of someone they love.

The second article in this series completes the list of essential books that can help you move through your process of grief. Loss is a difficult challenge to experience, and these can be a great resource to help you move through it gently, softly, and in a healthy way.

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The Best Books On Teen Grief and Loss – Part One

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Lucy Nguyen

Lucy Nguyen, LMFT
Medical Reviewer

Lucy Nguyen is the Executive Director at Paradigm Treatment, overseeing all clinical treatment programs across the organization's southwestern region. Her extensive experience includes working with young adults in private practice, serving as a therapist for children and teens with emotional and behavioral needs, and acting as a behavior interventionist for teens with developmental disorders. Lucy integrates cognitive-behavioral approaches with mindfulness and compassion in her work, and she is also EMDR-trained. She holds a Master of Science in Counseling from California State University, Fullerton, and a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine.

Teens, let’s face it, grief is a difficult emotional process to go through. It’s can be a long road that requires patience and self-care. Although parents and caregivers and everyone around you will want to do what they can to help you move through it faster, the truth is, the process needs time.

It needs tending to but you don’t need to rush it. At same time, you don’t want to completely ignore your pain. You don’t want to never look at it or push it away with drugs or drinking. It’s best to be with it, let your feelings be there.

And you can facilitate your healing process by talking to others about how you feel.  You might also simply need time alone, time to digest what’s going on inside and around you. The following list of books is meant to be a resource for you to draw upon. Teens, when you’re looking for support but you don’t necessarily want to go to someone, you can turn to the gentle words in these books:

Straight Talk About Death for Teenagers: How to Cope with Losing Someone You Love by Earl A. Grollman

The author of this book knows grief and knows teenagers well. It is a unique book that is a combination of both prose and poetry, speaking directly to the hearts and minds of readers.

Fire in My Heart, Ice in My Veins: A Journal for Teenagers Experiencing a Loss by Enid Samuel Traisman

This journal invites teenagers to work through their grief in a creative and healthy way.

 

When A Friend Dies: A Book for Teens About Grieving and Healing by Marilyn E. Gootman, Pamela Espeland, and Deborah Prothrow-Stith

This is a quick read for teens who are grieving, but its short chapters are filled with support.

 

The Grieving Teen: A Guide for Teenagers and Their Friends by Helen Fitzgerald

The author of this book takes a look at how the unique needs of teenagers are affected by grief and loss. She explores how being a teen while also experiencing grief can present unique challenges that need special attention.

 

Child’s View of Grief by Alan D. Wolfelt, Lori Mackey (Illustrator)

This is a resource for parents, providing them with principles and tools to help their children cope with grief.

 

Healing Your Grieving Heart: 100 Practical Ideas for Teens by Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D.

Each page of this book provides a different idea to help teens recognize mourning as a natural process. It’s perfect for students in grades seven and above.

 

After Suicide by John H. Hewett and Wayne E. Oates

This book is for the individual in the throes of responding to the suicide of someone they love.

The second article in this series completes the list of essential books that can help you move through your process of grief. Loss is a difficult challenge to experience, and these can be a great resource to help you move through it gently, softly, and in a healthy way.

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